Are we a country whose democracy is active, or are we at a point where our democracy is approaching a state of inaction?

Democracyinaction Politics and Policies free discussions

5Nov/120

The last word from our contributors

Posted by Nate

Matt

Matt:

Please vote to lessen the likelihood of us going off the cliff, not the "fiscal" cliff, but rather the environmental cliff, the knowledge cliff and the equality cliff. The goal of an amoral Romney and the G.O.P. is simply to concentrate wealth and power in the hands of a few. If they prevail, I fear they will do whatever it takes to preserve their riches and dominion. The preponderance of voter suppression and misinformation by the G.O.P in this election should provide fair warning to all of us that oligarchs do not give up power easily. This may be our last chance.

Lou

Lou:

Obama wins, popular vote within 1%, Obama 290 +/- 5 electoral votes. Republicans are desperate.

Wally about the danger of electing Republican President

Wally

Wally:

When asked to provide a brief paragraph regarding final thoughts on the election, of course I said yes. What a great idea! Let’s start with the fact that our two-party system is broken, probably beyond repair. That’s why I’ll be looking at alternatives in the future. The Republican Party has moved so far to the right that it looks more like a Fascist Party to me. “Let’s round up all those illegal Hispanics and put them in camps.” I don’t think I’ll be voting Republican any time soon. And although the Democrats are certainly the lesser of two evils, they are far from innocent regarding the gridlock in Congress and the current partisan politics. Maybe it’s time to look at the Citizens Party, the Green Party, or even independent candidates like Ron Paul. You say a wasted vote. At this point what’s the difference? The Republicans and Democrats are both owned by big business and money. Something has to change. The partisan politics has to stop. The filibusters have to stop. Were there really over 300 filibusters by the Republicans during the Obama administration? It’s about time our leaders learn how to play nice together in their little Washington sandbox. I believe this could happen if Obama is re-elected, the Democrats maintain a majority in the Senate, and they pick up a few seats in the House. With no more focus on just destroying Obama at the expense of the nation the Republicans might come to their senses. They might even reflect on the changing demographics in the country and come to the realization that the party will not survive if it doesn’t become a little more inclusive.

Nate about the Tea Party

Nate

Nate:

In my opinion, if Romney wins and the Tea Party will dictate policies, we are in for a huge crash. The crisis of 2008 will look mild in comparison. Too many zealots in Congress create a real dangerous situation. We cannot allow the ignorant fanatics to control America.

Susan about the Chicago Tribune endorsement of Obama

Sue

Susan:

Once again, President Barack Obama will enjoy his hometown Tribune's seal of approval, the newspaper has announced. The paper lauded the president for his careful projection of military power abroad and pragmatism as the country's economic "dominoes toppled."  The Tribune editorial reads:

Four years ago, when we endorsed Obama’s run for the White House, we said he would act with decisiveness and intellectual rigor. Ironically he has shown those attributes most where Americans might have expected them least.

The right-leaning paper admitted that Mitt Romney's policies should have made him a more obvious choice for their endorsement, but they described the GOP nominee as "astonishingly willing to bend his views to the politics of the moment: on abortion, on immigration, on gun laws and, most famously, on health care."

The most recent polling on the presidential race showed Romney narrowly leading Obama nationally, while Obama maintains an edge in the key battleground states.

Anna about Romney and Tea party combination

Anna

Anna:

No matter who is elected President, Mitt Romney or Barack Obama, the country will continue to live and strive. The economy will grow. If Obama is re-elected, he will take credit for putting policies in place that allowed the economy to improve and grow. If Romney is elected, he will takes all the credit for the next good economic years.

The difference, we as a country will experience, will be in our social policies, in the shape of our society. Are we going to have a society with equal rights for all, or one that focuses on individualism? Are we going to be an equal partner in the world or will we protect our society from the outside world? Are we going to have a government for the people or a government for the highest bidder?

These are the choices. Hopefully, after Nov. 6, we will get back to being Americans, we will smile at our neighbors, shake hands with those with whom we disagree, help those who need our help, celebrate together.

The best is still in our future, not in our past.

Ed

Ed:

There is much discussion on TV about what a close race it is, and little acknowledgment of Nate Silver's analysis of the battleground states.  At last word, Silver gave Obama an 85.5% chance of winning the electoral college.  I hope he is right, because if Romney wins the election, it will be a very, very sad day.  A Romney win will be a win for the Tea Party, which represents everything bad about America.  The most disturbing thing going on, to me, is the racism--the fact that enormous numbers of people will vote against Obama because of his color, not because they like Romney or even because they care about issues. 

   

Featuring Recent Posts WordPress Widget development by YD